Car accident in Ecuador

“Oh, sh-t” I thought as I sat there looking at the motorcyclist on the ground.

I had tried to make a quick U-turn (where maybe I shouldn’t have) and a motorcycle trying to zip around me on the right clipped my bumper and him and his bike went tumbling down.

He quickly got up and got in my face as I still sat in the drivers seat.

“Give me $1000 now for the damage on my bike!”  He shouted as his bike laid in the street.

“Hey, I got insurance buddy,”  I said in my muffled Spanish.

Then… “Wham”!

A big noise made me cinch my face muscles.  I looked over my shoulder and I couldn’t believe my eyes!

While the motorcyclists bike laid there in the street and he was arguing with me to give him a quick buck, another car came and run over his motorcycle!

It was now completely wrangled around the under-organs of the car that just passed over it.

The bike now totaled.  Before, it was damaged but he probably could have just drove off.

Now, there were two angry Ecuadorians yelling at each other and me to one side.  You see, in Ecuador during a car accident I think the locals think that whoever can yell the loudest will be granted the right of way.

Within a few minutes the police showed up.

Immediately, the police said all the vehicles would be impounded until a traffic court could determine guilt, unless we could work something out.

Then he asked for our documents.

License and registration.

And to my surprise, but I suppose not uncommon in Ecuador, both the motorcyclist and the other car driver had no license nor proper registration.

So the policeman quickly looked to me, the calm, bewildered foreigner with the proper documents and said to me… “give the motorcycle guy $100, give that car driver $150 cash… and get out of here.”

My truck just had a few scratches on it after-all.

“Yes, officer,” I said joyfully and away I went!

That’s how a car accident more or less works in Ecuador.

The wild west?  Yea, with these kinds of things I’d say so.

STORY PROVIDED BY …

Jack Abercrombie, a guy from Atlanta who has been living in Ecuador a few years now.
He has a truck he uses to help new arrival expats in Ecuador move large loads of goods and pets within Ecuador.  You can reach him at journeymanjack.com@gmail.com or 770-828-7913(USA) or 098-743-3009(ECUADOR).  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanjack 

 

3 things to consider before you lie on your property deed in Ecuador

This past week in this newsletter we touched on the reality of Ecuador property in that the municipally appraised values often are MUCH less than the real commercial values the property sells at.

I just want to inform on the reality of the situation, the choice is yours to put the real price you paid on the deed or just the minimum needed or the municipally appraised value.

But there are three things to consider when making the choice…

1. Do you need this property to get an investors residency visa in Ecuador?

If so then you MUST put at least $25,000 value on the property plus $500 for each dependent.  Still valid in 2016.

2. How long do you plan on keeping the property?

Putting the lower amount can help minimize notary and municipal fees now at time of purchase and your yearly property taxes (predios), but keep in mind the next buyer might not want to put the lower amount meaning you’d get nailed with a hefty capital gains tax bill!  So if you plan to keep the property for the long term this may not be an issue.

3. Is there any chance this property could be expropriated by the government?  Like to widen a road (I’ve seen many times in Ecuador), or build a bridge, park, etc…

If so, keep in mind the government only pays according to the low-ball MUNICIPAL APPRAISED VALUE of the property but if you have the higher real value on the property you could make a good case that the property is actually worth that and get all or part of that higher value.
Now, the choice is yours!

 

Up goes the walls, costs and more: Ecuador building project week 2-3

Now with the floor and columns up time for the walls…

After building with blocks on this house, next time, I’m going to use bricks, why?

Although the labor time is much more, the walls won’t crack, are more solid and after all you may use less cement cause you don’t have to plaster over the walls when finished.

We used 15 cm wide blocks for walls and filled with cement for noise protection.

For a 190 square meter house that we are building on the coast of Ecuador.  We needed 2100 cement blocks at 38 cents each.   TOTAL price $798.

Cheaper than bricks, you bet, and much faster to build!